Minimalism

Eliminate all that is unnecessary from my life

  • Better financial security
  • Reduced stress and anxiety levels
  • Focus on what's important
  • Fewer distractions

Cleaning and organising

  1. Clean less, more frequently
  2. Create piles of stuff that no longer adds value, remove it all at once when you're sick of looking at it
  3. Create systems for storing essential items in places that make sense
  4. Go through draws, cupboards, fridges, etc. 10 mins/week to find things to remove

Buying stuff

  1. Before buying, consider the value the product will add
  2. Buy fewer, higher quality things that last longer
  3. Avoid eBay, Aliexpress, IKEA, etc
  4. Ignore retail employee up-sell, understand the product you're buying
  5. Set aside money each pay cycle to save for things that add value

Selling stuff

After many horrible experiences trying to sell my stuff on Gumtree I've decided to:

  1. Donate stuff instead
  2. Give things away for free on Gumtree
  3. Gift stuff to friends or family instead
  4. Sell stuff to friends or family instead at a really good price*

*By really good price, I mean practically free. Once I'm selling something I've decided that it no longer adds value to my life. Unless I need to recoup the cost of the item (which is likely if it was a big purchase) I would prefer to help my friends and family out with a great deal.

Recycling

  • 1800 Got Junk will take away anything and aim to dispose of it responsibly
  • Apple GiveBack will recycle old Apple devices for free
  • Appliances Online will take away old items for free upon delivery
  • H&M will accept old clothes to reuse or recycle
  • Harvey Norman will recycle an old TV for you
  • Officeworks has a variety of sustainability focused recycling services
  • Redcycle is often present at your local Coles or Woolies (Australian supermarkets) that will recycle your soft plastics

Digital

  1. Scan post/christmas/birthday cards and store them in cloud storage if they contain sentimental value
  2. Scan paper bills/notices/letters that need to be kept for tax or financial reasons and store them in secure cloud storage
  3. Uninstall apps and software from your devices once you've stopped using them or haven't used them for >1 month
  4. Intentionally buy smaller storage devices that force you to consider the value of the data it holds. Cheap storage providers exist.
  5. Unless you need it for business, delete social media apps and accounts*
  6. Install an ad blocker in your browser or on your network

*This can be controversial but there are a million and one articles about why this is a good idea and will lead to a happier, healthier, and more productive life.

Tech

Warning: controversial opinion

At most, you'll not need more than 2-4 "smart" devices.

  1. Powerful desktop*
  2. Cheap (or employer supplied) laptop (Lenovo)**
  3. Smart phone
  4. Kindle (or similar e-reader) - not an iPad

*If you don't play games or need the compute power above a mid-range laptop then you only need #2 and #3.

**Apple laptops, while amazing in build quality and value-retention, have lost their spot in my recommendations as they've finally priced themselves out of what I consider "good value".

Food

Preparing and managing food isn't something I've been a huge fan but these services and products have made food preparation, food waste management, and healthy consumption far more "doable" for me.

  1. Meal replacement drinks (Aussielent)
  2. Meal box deliveries (Dinnerly, Hello Fresh, Marley Spoon)

Reading

Most of these will be documented on my reading list page but the following are specific to minimalism and intentional living.

Links


Content properties

  • Type: Note
  • Category: Life
  • Tags: minimalism, consumerism
  • Custom slug: None

This is a preview of a simpler page design that I'm working on over the next little bit. I've finally added a (click it!) but there's still a few pages left to be converted so don't worry if things don't look quite right just yet šŸ™

Content on blog pages use the CC-BY-SA license. The source code and notes use the MIT license. Unsure? Mention me on Mastodon.